Course Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to: 1. Differentiate sociology from other social and natural sciences. 2. Explain the aims and scope of socialization as it affects the development of the self. 3. Define normative behavior as it relates to cultural lifestyles. 4. Identify the causes and effects of social structure and social stratification. 5. Describe the basic social institutions that regulate social interaction. 6. Describe ministerial strategy and impact in the midst of social change. 7. Compare and contrast biblical insights with various sociological insights regarding the relationship of self to society. 8. Exhibit keener spiritual sensitivity in personal ministry.
Table of Contents
UNIT ONE: Sociology: A Scientific Discipline 1 Sociology as an Academic Discipline...........................16 2 Sociology as a Scientific Endeavor...............................28 UNIT TWO: Socialization: Human Beings as Social Beings 3 Socialization and the Self.............................................48 4 Socialization as a Lifelong Process..............................66 UNIT THREE: Culture: The Fabric of Human Society 5 Culture: A System of Norms.........................................82 6 Cultural Diversity..........................................................100 7 Subcultures..................................................................114 UNIT FOUR: Social Organization and Social Stratification 8 From Folk to Mass Society...........................................130 9 Bureaucracy: Administration of Mass Society..............148 10 Social Strata: Methods of Study and Indicators.........162 11 Social Location and Social Mobility............................182 UNIT FIVE: Social Institutions and Social Change 12 Social Institutions: Marriage and Family.....................198 13 Education, Religion, Economics, and Politics............216 14 Collective Behavior and Social Change.....................232
Course Introduction
Introduction to Sociology The basic premise of sociology is that no one is ever totally independent. The Chinese language illustrates this well in its character for the word man. This character looks like two sticks leaning on each other, refering to “one man leaning against another.” It means that humanity cannot be humanity alone. A teacher without students cannot be a teacher; a pastor without a congregation is meaningless. You need someone, and consequently someone needs you. Sociology is the study of the interdependency that is characteristic of humankind. Human relationships, which are referred to as social interaction, are the very center of life. They are the basis for society and all that is stable and predictable in life, and they are the source of all social change as well. Christians are commissioned in God’s Word to take the gospel to the ends of the earth. This action involves relating to people in every society. Through the study of this course, you will learn about the development, structure, interaction, and collective life of organized groups of human beings. You will come to understand why people think and behave the way they do. This can only enhance your personal relationships with others. God’s command to love your neighbor as you love yourself will take on new meaning in your life.
Course Description Introduction to Sociology SOC2012/3 (Credit: 2 or 3 hours) This course presents a general survey of the nature and scope of sociology, including the basic methods and concepts such as socialization, culture, social organization, social stratification, social institutions, and social change. Emphasis is given to the principle that our behavior is influenced by our relationships with others. These concepts are related to Christian living and ministry.
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY