Course Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to: 1. Identify the nature of humankind as described in the Word of God. 2. Assess the effect of the Fall on human nature. 3. Discuss the effect of idolatry on the human heart. 4. Explain the many influences on the human heart. 5. Describe the many resources of grace available to humankind for lasting change. 6. Compose a biblical theology of marriage. 7. Construct a biblical model of marriage counseling. Resources
Table of Contents
UNIT ONE: A Biblical Model 1 Adopting an Image.......................................................16 2 Changing the Human Heart..........................................28 3 Experiencing Change through Grace...........................40 UNIT TWO: A Biblical Theology 4 Ideal Marriage...............................................................54 5 Christian Marriage....................................................................70 6 Purified Marriage...........................................................90 UNIT THREE: A Biblical Procedure 7 Process Propositions...................................................104 8 Motivation Mentoring....................................................124 9 Relational Rebuilding...................................................138 10 Communication Cures................................................152 11 Resolution Restoration...............................................170
Course Introduction
Marriage Counseling: A Cross-Cultural Approach I (Joseph Lear, the author) have had ministry opportunities in America as well as in many different parts of the world. It has become clear to me that marital distress is universal. Pastors have received little training on how to counsel Christian couples experiencing marital problems. I was once told of a pastor who used to beat his wife. The only way his wife could get him to stop was to scream anytime he came near her in anger. The pastor did not want his church members to know he and his wife were having marital problems, so he refrained from hitting her. Obviously, he did not know how to counsel himself, much less counsel others experiencing marital distress. This course attempts to address this worldwide void of pastoral training in marriage counseling. Numerous theories and approaches to counseling exist. Many secular and Christian integration (the joining of theology and psychology) approaches have been popularized in the West and are now appearing in many parts of the world. In contrast, this course presents a model Timothy Sisemore (2001) has called bibliotherapy (329), using the all-sufficient Word of God (2 Timothy 3:16–17) in counseling. David Powlison (2003) writes, “The faith is always better than the best of other models; God shouts clearly what others mumble” (214). The course begins by looking at a biblical model of lasting change, based on a biblical theology. In Unit 2 that theology of marriage is developed by examining two key biblical passages to give us a clear understanding of God’s purpose for Christian marriage. Unit 3 presents a biblical-practical-motive model of marriage counseling. Marriage illustrations from various cultures have been inserted to help the student see how the biblical model can be a powerful tool in the pastoral counselor’s hand. read more
Course Description Marriage Counseling: A Cross-Cultural Approach (MIS2062/3—Credit 2 or 3 hours) Marital distress is universal. This course attempts to address the void of pastoral training in marriage counseling. Founded on God’s Word, it begins by looking at a model of lasting change based on a biblical theology. Key biblical passages are examined to establish a clear understanding of God’s purpose for Christian marriage. A biblical- practical-motive model of marriage counseling is presented. Marriage illustrations from various cultures help show how the biblical model can be a powerful tool in the pastoral counselor’s hand.
Marriage Counseling: A Cross-Cultural Approach